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Chaos: Chaos Theory, Butterfly Effect, Ginnungagap, Bifurcation Diagram, Emergence, Turbulence, Quantum Chaos, for Want of a Source Wikipedia

Chaos: Chaos Theory, Butterfly Effect, Ginnungagap, Bifurcation Diagram, Emergence, Turbulence, Quantum Chaos, for Want of a

Source Wikipedia

Published August 30th 2011
ISBN : 9781158130221
Paperback
50 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 49. Chapters: Chaos theory, Butterfly effect, Ginnungagap, Bifurcation diagram, Emergence, Turbulence, QuantumMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 49. Chapters: Chaos theory, Butterfly effect, Ginnungagap, Bifurcation diagram, Emergence, Turbulence, Quantum chaos, For Want of a Nail, Self-organized criticality, Coupled map lattice, Stability of the Solar System, Recurrence quantification analysis, Fractal dimension, Recurrence plot, Chaotic mixing, Synchronization of chaos, Feigenbaum function, Chaotic bubble, Chaotic hysteresis, Bus bunching, Transfer operator, Oscillon, Correlation dimension, Poincar plot, Control of chaos, Nonlinear Dynamics, Chirikov criterion, Chaos communications, Chaos game, Interconnectivity, Edge of chaos, Quantum ergodicity, Uncertainty exponent, Complexor, Correlation integral, Correlation sum, Lagrangian coherent structure, Stable attractor, Mixmaster dynamics. Excerpt: Chaos theory is a field of study in mathematics, with applications in several disciplines including physics, economics, biology, and philosophy. Chaos theory studies the behavior of dynamical systems that are highly sensitive to initial conditions, an effect which is popularly referred to as the butterfly effect. Small differences in initial conditions (such as those due to rounding errors in numerical computation) yield widely diverging outcomes for chaotic systems, rendering long-term prediction impossible in general. This happens even though these systems are deterministic, meaning that their future behavior is fully determined by their initial conditions, with no random elements involved. In other words, the deterministic nature of these systems does not make them predictable. This behavior is known as deterministic chaos, or simply chaos. Chaotic behavior can be observed in many natural systems, such as the weather. Explanation of such behavior may be sought through analysis of a chaotic mathematical model, or through analytical techniques such as recurrence plots and Poinc...