Home » Joint Field Hearing on Davis-Bacon Fraud and Abuse: Hearing of the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections and the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee and Economic and Educational Opportunities, U. S. House of Representatives, One by Unknown author
Joint Field Hearing on Davis-Bacon Fraud and Abuse: Hearing of the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections and the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee and Economic and Educational Opportunities, U. S. House of Representatives, One Unknown author

Joint Field Hearing on Davis-Bacon Fraud and Abuse: Hearing of the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections and the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee and Economic and Educational Opportunities, U. S. House of Representatives, One

Unknown author

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781332520336
Paperback
180 pages
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Excerpt from Joint Field Hearing on Davis-Bacon Fraud and Abuse: Hearing of the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections and the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee and Economic and Educational Opportunities, U. S. House ofMoreExcerpt from Joint Field Hearing on Davis-Bacon Fraud and Abuse: Hearing of the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections and the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee and Economic and Educational Opportunities, U. S. House of Representatives, One Hundred and Fourth Congress, Second Session, Joint FThe subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 10 a.m., in the U.S. Courthouse, 200 N.W. Fourth Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Hon. Cass Ballenger, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections, presiding.Members present: Representatives Ballenger and Hoekstra.Also present: Representative Istook.Chairman Ballenger. A quorum being present, I would like to call together this joint hearing of the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections and the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations.The subcommittee is meeting today to hear the testimony on allegations of fraud, abuse and favoritism in the Davis-Bacon Act uncovered by the Oklahoma Department of Labor. I have a brief opening statement.The Davis-Bacon Act requires contractors on federally funded construction projects valued at over $2,000 to pay a government-determined prevailing or inflated salary in a specific city or area.When the Act was passed in 1931, there were no Federal minimum wage laws or other labor laws with protection for workers, and since that time Congress has enacted numerous laws to protect the wages and working conditions for all workers, including construction workers. Some $48 million annually in Federal construction spending falls under the Davis-Bacon Act requirements.Also, the Congressional Budget Office says that the Davis-Bacon Act raises the government construction costs on the order of $1 billion a year- clearly, Davis-Bacon drives up construction costs. Electricians in Philadelphia who are working on a Davis-Bacon project are paid $37 an hour, compared with an electrician on a private contract, who is paid only $15.76. Or consider the backhoe operator in Oklahoma whose salary was $22 an hour on a Federal construction job, compared with the private rate of $8.40 an hour. Companies cannot stay in business paying $37 or $22 an hour to an employee when the market rate is much less.The total cost of Davis-Bacon extends to State and local government construction programs, thus having the same practical implications as an unfunded mandate. Davis-Bacon is particularly burdensome in the area of school construction.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.