Home » The Gospel in the Wildernesss: Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy by Horatius Bonar
The Gospel in the Wildernesss: Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy Horatius Bonar

The Gospel in the Wildernesss: Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy

Horatius Bonar

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Kindle Edition
34 pages
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 About the Book 

Horatius Bonar (1808 – 1889) was a Scottish pastor, poet, and devotional writer.This book contains the following meditations:1. Liberty and Service (Ex 8:1)2. The Day of Despair (Ex 8:28)3. The Blood of Deliverance (Ex 12:11)4. How God DealsMoreHoratius Bonar (1808 – 1889) was a Scottish pastor, poet, and devotional writer.This book contains the following meditations:1. Liberty and Service (Ex 8:1)2. The Day of Despair (Ex 8:28)3. The Blood of Deliverance (Ex 12:11)4. How God Deals With Sin and the Sinner (Lev 4:27-35)5. The Fire Quenched (Lev 6:13)6. The Vision From the Rocks (Num 23:9)7. The Doom of the Double-Hearted (Num 31:8)8. Be Not Borderers (Deut 10:2)9. The Outlines of a Saved Sinner’s History (Deut 32:10)10. Divine Longings Over the Foolish (Deut 32:29)Perhaps you say, I see that God has provided a propitiation, that this is complete, and available for me, but how am I to be so connected with it as to obtain the pardon? writes Bonar. Everything depends on this connection being established, for without it there is no pardon. Now, how did the Israelite connect himself with the sin-offering? He simply took the lamb and brought it to the priest and said, Let this stand for me, laying his hand on it and thereby transferring all his guilt to it. So we, by receiving the testimony and the promise, connect ourselves with the divine atonement. We go to God saying, Let this life and death be for my life and death. We consent to be dealt with on the footing of another, not our own, and immediately the personal exchange takes place. He gets all our evil, we get all His good. Our demerit goes to Him, His merit comes to us. We take the royal grant of life and righteousness through the life and death of another. Pardon is secured, and ought to be a thing as sure and as conscious to us, as to the Israelite after he had brought the sacrifice and seen it laid on the altar.